大きくする 標準 小さくする

柳美里『東京上野公園口』英訳版が出版

2019/07/08

柳美里『東京上野公園口』英訳版が出版 

情報提供 : Books and Rights Marketplace




2019.06.09    柳美里『東京上野公園口』英訳版が出版

 


 
   今年3月、芥川賞作家の柳美里さんの小説『東京上野公園口』の英語版が、
Tilted Axis Pressより出版されました。翻訳したのは、アメリカのケンタッキー州出身の翻訳家モーガン・ジャイルズさんです。出版に当たって、今年2月にイギリスで開かれたイベント「Japan Now」で、柳さんとジャイルズさんとの対談が実現しました。


『東京上野公園口』は
2014年に発表された小説で、柳さんによれば、その12年前に上野公園でホームレスの男性に出会ったことが、この小説を書くきっかけだったそうです。物語は福島県出身の和という名の男の人生を描いたものです。和は、今年4月に退位された明仁天皇と同じ年に生まれましたが、明仁天皇とは対照的な人生を送ります。1964年に開催された東京オリンピックの前年、和は、工事現場で働くために東京にやってきます。その後、何度か福島に帰りますが、息子を亡くし、妻にも先立たれて、最後には上野公園に戻ってきてホームレスとなります。柳美里さんの小説といえば、自身の心境や人生を描いた私小説が有名でしたが、この小説は柳さんにとって新境地を開いた小説といってよいでしょう。

翻訳者のジャイルズさんにとって難しかったのは福島の方言だったそうです。また、それ以上に翻訳を難しくしていたのは、会話の中で過去と未来が錯綜していて、さらにそれを情緒的な言葉で表現されていたことでした。翻訳に当たって柳さんはジャイルズさんに非常に協力的で、ジャイルズさんの様々な質問に答えてくれたとのことです。翻訳が終わるころ、柳さんはジャイルズさんを福島に招いており、これも翻訳に大きな助けになったと、ジャイルズさんはインタビューで答えています。

柳さんは神奈川県の自宅を引き払った後、現在は、福島県相馬市に住んでいます。2011年の震災と原発事故の後、人が住まなくなった土地ですが、柳さんは2015年にこの地に移住しています。その後、柳さんは自宅を改装して、ブックカフェ「フルハウス」をオープンしました。今ではここが地元の人たちとの重要な交流の場となっています。

https://scroll.in/article/917580/why-is-everyone-suddenly-reading-this-japanese-novel-the-translator-tries-to-explain

https://bit.ly/2IzEZIG

https://www.sankei.com/life/news/140430/lif1404300024-n1.html

https://motion-gallery.net/projects/fullhouse-bookcafe

 

2019.06.09    Japan's Akutagawa Award Winner Yu Miri's Book to be Translated
 


 
 Yu Miri's "Tokyo Ueno Station," winner of the prestigious Akutagawa Award, has been translated into English and published from Tilted Axis Press. It was translated by Morgan Giles from Kentucky, USA. The two had an opportunity to meet in the UK in February, at an event called "Japan Now." 




"Tokyo Ueno Station" came out in 2014. According to the author Yu, the novel is a study of poverty, how places accumulate memory and become part of what we call the past. In 2006, Yu began meeting the homeless in Ueno. She listened to their stories and learned about their lives before they came to live in the park. 

One such man is Kazu, the main character of the novel, who looks back on his hardscrabble life. Born in Fukushima in 1933, the same year as the Emperor of Japan, he leaves his wife and children in search of employment, first in Tokyo, where he works in construction for the 1964 Olympics, then in Sendai. After the death of his son and wife in the 1980s, Kazu spirals into despair and homelessness. In a tent village in Ueno Park, he meets other laborers who once helped Japan’s postwar boom, spending their lives building highways, hospitals, and schools.

“Translating the dialogue, much of which is in the Tohoku dialect, required a lot of work and help from friends,” says Giles in an interview. “The main challenge was that the novel drifts between present and past, blending the two with pieces of overheard conversations and poetic descriptions. It was hard to achieve this effect in English, which needs to be much more explicit than Japanese.”

Since the book was originally published, Yu sold her home outside of Tokyo and moved to Soma-city, Fukushima. It is one of those once-deserted towns after the Great East Japan Earthquake and the nuclear power plant disaster. After the relocation, she renovated the house to open a bookstore-cafe called "Full House," which has become a lively gathering place for the local residents.

https://scroll.in/article/917580/why-is-everyone-suddenly-reading-this-japanese-novel-the-translator-tries-to-explain

https://bit.ly/2IzEZIG

https://www.sankei.com/life/news/140430/lif1404300024-n1.html

https://motion-gallery.net/projects/fullhouse-bookcafe




編集部宛メールフォーム

お名前:必須

Eメールアドレス:必須

Eメールアドレス(確認用):必須
(確認の為、同じものをもう一度入力してください)

記事タイトル:必須


メッセージ:必須

ファイル添付:

削除

【連載】BRM NEWS

編集部宛投稿メール

編集部宛の投稿は以下のフォームからお送りください。

みなさまの投稿をお待ちしております。

 

【編集部宛メールフォーム】